Public Outreach: Wetland Ecosystems Talk at St. Edmund Elementary/ Junior High School

Last week, Logan McLeod and myself travelled to St. Edmund Elementary/ Junior High School to give a presentation on wetland ecosystems to the grade 5 students. The students learned about wetlands, including the differences between wetland classes and what kinds of flora and fauna can be found in these habitats. We also introduced the students to our work with bioacoustics and had them identify some of the vocalizations of common wetland species. The talk ended in a brief meet and greet with three tiger salamanders, which we had brought along to show the students. The students took in a huge amount of information on wetland ecosystems and left the presentation ready to go explore the local wetlands in our city. One step to conserving our wetlands is understanding their value by experiencing them first hand.

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Text by Natasha Annich, photos by Christina Panizzon, grade 5 teacher at St. Edmund Elementary/Junior High school.

An Ode to the Boreal Forest

This week, PhD student Julia Shonfield wrote a blog post for Dispatches from the Field about her experience doing field work over multiple seasons in the boreal forest. The boreal forest covers a huge area in Canada, yet many Canadians don’t really know too much about how incredibly varied this ecosystem is or what it’s like to work there. Check it out on Dispatches from the Field. Each week you can tune in to that website to find out what field work is really like.

South Rockies Grizzly Bear Progress Report (2006-2014)

A progress report for the South Rockies Grizzly Bear Project was recently released by Clayton Lamb and Garth Mowat.

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Notably, the authors document a 40% decline in grizzly bear populations in the South Rockies GBPU (North of Hwy 3) between 2006-2013, with very high and depensatory mortality rates, largely due to non-hunting mortality sources.

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The full report can be accessed by clicking the thumbnail below:

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Field Fun Friday

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Brown-headed cowbirds are brood parasites, animals that use other organisms to raise their young. Parents will lay their eggs in a different species nest, and the unsuspecting host will incubate the eggs, and feed the giant chicks, often at the expense of their own offpring. Here, a tiny black-and-white warbler feeds its unintentional adoptee. Post and photos by Anjolene Hunt.