Showcase: Bayne lab volunteers and undergraduate students

Volunteers and undergraduate students play an important role in research labs, and get the opportunity to kick-start their ecological careers!

We’d like to introduce you to these hardworking folks, and recognize the diverse and interesting projects they are working on. THANK YOU volunteers and undergrads!


Student: Logan Bradley

Status with Bayne lab: Volunteer

Grad student they work with: Emily Upham-Mills

1

Logan is an undergraduate student in the Department of Biological Sciences at the U of A. He is very passionate about birds and spends much of his free time birdwatching and hiking. He has volunteered with the Beaverhill Bird Observatory and looks forwards to getting more involved with bird research and conservation.


Student: Stephanie Parth

Status with Bayne lab: BIOL 298

Grad student they work with:    Emily Upham-Mills

2

Stephanie is a second year undergraduate student in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Alberta. She is assisting Emily in testing the accuracy of different Olive-sided Flycatcher recognizers using Songscope software. She is interested in pursuing veterinary science in the future but is currently enjoying research in the field of science.


Student: Beth (Bryan) Yakimets

Status with Bayne lab: Volunteer

Grad student they work with: Emily Upham-Mills

3

Beth (Bryan) Yakimets is a fifth year student of the ALES Faculty, majoring in Conservation Biology. He is an avid bird lover and is interested in working with birds after graduating. He also has an interest in wildlife rehabilitation, and spent the last summer at the WRSE. This is Bryan’s second year helping Emily with processing insect samples for her Olive-sided Flycatcher project.


Student: Keara Nelson

Status with Bayne lab: Volunteer

Grad student they work with: Emily Upham-Mills

4

Keara has a Wildlife and Fisheries Conservation diploma from Lakeland College, and is currently in the 4th year of her undergrad degree majoring in Conservation Biology at the U of A. This past summer she worked for the Canadian Wildlife Service as a high arctic shorebird technician with fieldwork taking place on Bathurst Island, NU. Keara is helping Emily to validate Songscope recognizer outputs for Olive-sided Flycatchers.


Student: Megan Szojka

Status with Bayne lab: BIOL 499

Grad student they work with: Janet Ng

5

Megan is in her 4th undergraduate year, studying Evolutionary Biology at the University of Alberta. She is currently working on a 499 research project to determine feeding dynamics between Ferruginous Hawk nestlings in relation to sibling order by watching pre-recorded video. She is pursuing a career as a field biologist, in the hopes of spending as much time outdoors as humanly possible.


Student: Elène Haave Audet

Status with Bayne lab:  BIOL 399

Grad student they work with:  Dan Yip

6

Elène is a third year Animal Biology undergraduate student at the U of A. She is conducting a study on distance estimation methodology using acoustic recordings of birds. Though she is currently studying temperate systems, her passion lies in tropical biodiversity, where she loves to conduct field work.


Student: Dhakshayini Boopalan

Status with Bayne lab: BIOL 499

Grad student they work with: Elly Knight

7

Dhakshayini is a 4th year undergraduate student majoring in Biological sciences. Her undergraduate research project focuses on the roadside edge effects on Common Nighthawks. Originally from India, she moved to Edmonton for university and has been in love with Alberta ever since. She has always had a passion for animals, and is interested in animal behaviour and wildlife conservation. In her free time, she enjoys hiking and being outdoors, taking photos and exploring the city.


Student: Ijlal Amir

Status with Bayne lab: BIOL 298

Grad students they work with: Elly Knight and Dan Yip


Ijlal is a second year undergraduate student in the bachelors of science with a major in general biology and a minor in chemistry at the moment. He is working with Elly and Dan to analyze the transect data and recordings for CONI.


Student: Lan Truong

Status with Bayne lab: BIOL 298

Grad students they work with: Elly Knight and Dan Yip

Lan Truong is a second year Biological Sciences student in the Faculty of Science at the U of A. She is currently studying how certain weather covariates affect the detection distances of the Common Nighthawk, using data from autonomous recording units (ARUs) and recognizer software. Lan loves to travel, and this summer she visited three countries during which the flights took her around the world!


Student: Rowan French

Status with Bayne lab: Volunteer

Grad student they work with: Emily Upham-Mills

10

Rowan is a second-year student in the honours animal biology program at the U of A, and began volunteering with Emily in October 2015. As a long-time birder and entomology enthusiast, Rowan is excited to identify insects from Olive-sided Flycatcher habitat in the Bayne Lab this year!


Student: Sarah Heemskerk

Status with Bayne lab: BIOL 399

Grad students they work with:  Julia Shonfield

11

Sarah is a fourth year Ecology Undergraduate Student in the Department of Biological Sciences at the U of A. She is currently studying use of different detection methods for Barred Owls in Northern Alberta using recognizer software. She has been fortunate enough to conduct field work in the mountains the past few summers as a field assistant for various studies and is interested in integrating scientific knowledge with public education.
-Post by Emily Upham-Mills

Fall Ferruginous Hawk Migration

Hawk migration is on!
University of Alberta M.Sc. student and Hawkwatch International Research Biologist Jesse Watson has been tracking Ferruginous Hawks on their breeding grounds and migratory routes. Read the full story in his Hawkwatch International blog

An adult Ferruginous Hawk equipped with a satellite transmitter backpack

An adult Ferruginous Hawk equipped with a satellite transmitter backpack

Current migration tracks for 18 adult male Ferruginous Hawks from southern Canada.

Current migration tracks for 18 adult male Ferruginous Hawks from southern Canada.

-Post and Photos by Jesse Watson